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REGION 3 ADMINISTRATION

Atlanta-DeKalb Alcohol Abuse Prevention Initiative

Afiya H. King, MPH, ICPS

Afiya H. King MPH, ICPS received a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology and Chemistry from Georgia State University and a Master of Public Health degree from Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta Georgia. Afiya is an Internationally Certified Prevention Specialist (ICPS) through the Prevention Credentialing Consortium of Georgia, serves on the PCCG Board of Directors. Afiya currently serves as the Assistant Director of Prevention/Intervention for the Council on Alcohol and Drugs and provides support to the executive leadership and staff in the areas of planning, management, program execution and communications. Afiya also serves as the Project Director for the Atlanta-DeKalb Alcohol Abuse Prevention Initiative and the SUPER Stop! program. In this capacity, Afiya is responsible for coordinating substance abuse prevention activities and developing relationships to reduce substance abuse among youth by addressing the factors that minimize the risk of substance abuse.
 
As an Ambassador for Social Change, Afiya has several years of experience working with youth and young adults to address substance use prevention from their perspective. Afiya’s experience includes improving the knowledge and skills of community stakeholders in alcohol policy implementation and local organizing strategies and has presented at numerous local and state conferences. Afiya has worked and volunteered in various capacities focusing on community mobilization, collaboration and program development.

Contact Details

Afiya King
270 Peachtree St. NW, Suite 2200
Atlanta, GA 30303
Phone: (404) 223-2487
Fax: (866) 324-7558
Email: aking(at)livedrugfree.org

Find Us Online

YouTube:
Parents Can Prevent

The Council on Alcohol and Drugs has launched an Alcohol Awareness Campaign for Georgia parents and caregivers in the Atlanta-DeKalb region to help provide resources and information to protect our underage youth from the harmful effects of drinking alcohol.

UPCOMING EVENTS

June 29th- Atlanta DeKalb Community Prevention Alliance Workgroup (CPAW) meeting

9:00 a.m. DeKalb County Juvenile Court 4309 Memorial Drive, Decatur GA 30032

July 14- Atlanta DeKalb Community Prevention Alliance Workgroup (CPAW)

9:00 a.m. DeKalb County Juvenile Court 4309 Memorial Drive, Decatur GA 30032

PREVENTION MATERIALS

The Atlanta-DeKalb Alcohol Abuse Prevention Initiative focuses on changing aspects of the environment that contribute to the abuse of alcohol. Environmental strategies aim to decrease the social and health consequences of alcohol abuse by limiting access to substances and changing social norms that are accepting and permissive of substance abuse.

COMMUNITY PARTNER SHOWCASE

Maynard H. Jackson High School


DeKalb County Board of Health
Maynard H. Jackson High School

Be Smart! Don't Start!

DeKalb County Juvenile Court

Maynard H. Jackson High School

Atlanta Public Schools
DeKalb County Board of Health

Atlanta Public Schools

Powerful Youth in Charge

DeKalb County Board of Health

Atlanta Public Schools
Montgomery County Schools

Wholistic Stress Control Institute

Fast and Furious Youth Action Team

Mohammed Schools of Atlanta

The Atlanta-DeKalb Alcohol Abuse Prevention Initiative is working with community partners through a Community Prevention Alliance Workgroup (CPAW) which consists of three sub-groups: Epidemiological Workgroup (to conduct the needs assessments), Planning and Operations Workgroup (for strategic planning and overseeing implementation) and an Evaluation and Sustainability Workgroup (to evaluate the implementation).

REGION 3 COMMUNITY SPECIFIC STRATEGIES

Positive Social Norms- Parent Intervention Model

This strategy seeks to reduce misperceptions of norms about underage drinking. Since most young people believe that their peers drink more and hold more permissive attitudes about drinking than they actually do, the social norms approach involves communicating actual drinking norms in order to dispel those myths. The idea is to correct misperceptions about what the majority of young people actually think and do concerning alcohol consumption, with the ultimate goal of changing drinking practices. Activities associated with this strategy include flyer and poster placement within each of the communities (SE Atlanta, SW DeKalb, Chamblee, Stone Mountain, and Clarkston) and directly to parents at Maynard Jackson High School and the Mohammed Schools of Atlanta. Community presentations, Community billboards in English and Spanish, Facebook campaign that provides newsfeed promoted memes, and Public Service Announcements aired on Facebook and YouTube and distributed in the community. All materials can be found in the prevention materials section on this webpage.

Counter Advertising

An environmental strategy used to balance the effects that alcohol advertising may have on alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems. Our efforts take the form of flyer and poster placement within each of the communities (SE Atlanta, SW DeKalb, Chamblee, Stone Mountain, and Clarkston) and directly to parents at Maynard Jackson High School and the Mohammed Schools of Atlanta. Radio Public Service Announcements (PSA) via the Total Traffic & Weather Network/GA News Network broadcasted on the following genre and stations: Gospel- Praise 102.5 (WPZE), Spanish- Z94.5 (WBZY), Sports- 92.9 The Game (WZGC), Top 40- Power 96.1 (WWPW), Urban- KISS 104.1 (WALR), Urban- Magic 107.9 (WAMJ), Urban Contemporary- Hot 107.9 (WHTA), Urban Contemporary- V-103.3 (WVEE). Also community presentations, community billboards, Facebook campaign that provides newsfeed promoted memes, and Public Service Announcements aired on Facebook and YouTube and distributed in the community. All materials can be found in the prevention materials section on this webpage.

Administrative Sanctions

Administrative Sanctions mean any formal official imposition of penalty or fine regarding an underage alcohol-related offense involving underage youth and/or their parents, including but not limited to undergoing an alcohol evaluation, prevention program attendance, participation in treatment possibly via a drug court, community service, restitution, charges or fees, revocation or suspension of license and taking other compulsory or restrictive action by such entities as a school system, a court system, law enforcement or the Georgia Department of Motor Vehicles. The goals of this strategy is to advocate for strengthen administrative sanctions and increase youth and parents' perception of sanctions as a consequence of underage drinking to assist in reducing the early onset of alcohol use. Activities for this strategy include creating a directory of agencies and persons responsible for sanctions, drafting an Administrative Sanctions Report expressing our findings concerning 1) current sanctions in place, 2) gaps in existing sanctions and 2) gaps in enforcement of those sanctions that are currently in place. Administrative Sanctions Report is intended for policy makers, law enforcement and community stakeholders in order to raise their awareness regarding any sanction gaps or enforcement gaps that are found, along with recommendations as to how to fill such gaps. Additional activities include advocating for those recommendations via a media campaign, policy education, and meetings and presentations with City Council members, Commissioners, school system personnel, law enforcement agencies as well as other community stakeholders. Only when sanctions are enforced and parents and youth are aware that such sanctions will be enforced will the perception of risk be increased among parents in relation to their youth and among the youth themselves.

In 2015 underage drinking cost Georgia $1.4 billion.

WHY JUST ALCOHOL?

2,375

Alcohol kills more kids and young people ages 18-25 than all other drugs combined. Youth ages 9-20 use it more than any other substance. An average of 2,375 people in Georgia die from alcohol-related injuries or illness each year.

Alcohol is the 3rd leading cause of death in Georgia.